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The Asian Pursuasion
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Discussion Starter #3
Trying to do it in sections starting with roof. Then floor then doors then the rest. Do you have a rough breakdown of quantity?
 

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Phoenix, AZ
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I would say you wound be good with about 100-150sqft of deadening material if you are going to do all of that stuff. You can always buy smaller amounts but, usually you will get a little bit of a discount for buying the products in larger quantities. When I deadened my hatch I used about 10sqft and it was pretty solid. If you use the same amount on all 4 door you will use about 50-60sqft then you can use the rest on the roof and floor.
 

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Start with 150 sq ft. 100 sq. ft. is not quite enough to do the entire vehicle right. Any extra can be used to double up in key spots. I recommend doubling directly behind the mids in the doors (the entire door if you have enough).
Also, here's a little trick for the roof if you've got some good pressure going on from subs. A/C Tape.
Go to your local auto parts store and ask for Air Conditioning Tape. They usually sell this in a roll of 20 to 30 ft. If they sell it in lesser quantities, buy 10 ft., but they usually sell the whole roll as one. The cost is probably going to be around $15 for a whole roll.
A/C Tape is thick butyl rubber that can be torn into pieces to seal gaps in A/C vents. It is also ideal at separating metal-to-metal contact points, like the roof and support ribs in the xB. Peel off chunks of this stuff, mash it into manageable pieces, and wedge it in between the roof and support ribs. You don't need to cover the entire beam, but isolating the panel in several spots will assist the existing foam in preventing the two metal parts from making contact under pressure, which makes a ton of noise. It also will bring the resonant frequency of the metal parts down, which will aid in deadening the roof panel. Lay out your deadening material over the panel once you're done with the A/C tape.
 

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OK, I know my opinions aren't the most popular here, but I'll throw in my 2 cents anyway. I've assisted another member of DIYMA with some CLD testing (the type of sound deadening you are referring to) and have been able to gain quite a bit of insight. I'll share my thoughts and you can do with it what you will. A link to the thread on DIYMA is below. It is long, but you can see results starting around page 10, I believe.

http://www.diymobileaudio.com/forum/member-reviews-product-comparisons/146403-sound-deadening-cld-testing.html

First, you absolutely don't NEED 100% coverage. Will it help? That is debatable as anything above evenly distributed 25% coverage leads to severely diminishing returns. You would be much better off spending less money on CLD and devoting more to CCF (Closed Cell Foam) and MLV (Mass Loaded Vinyl).

In terms of what brand to use, that is completely up to you. I will say that based on the testing, nothing beats Sound Deadener Showdown. It is also lighter than anything else that comes close in performance, but it is on the more expensive side. For a great cost effective alternative (ranked second behind Sound Deadener Showdown) take a look at Mudermat MDK (very hard to get ahold of now) and Knu Konceptz Kno Knoise Kolossus Edition. I went with the Kno Knoise option in my own build.

Sound Deadener Showdown also has some great information on their website. It isn't about marketing their product as much as it is educating the consumer and providing great installation information.

http://www.sounddeadenershowdown.com/

Below are some shots of the deadening I have performed so far on my own xB. I purchased 35 sf and am probably about half way through my supply with what I have done so far. I have not touched the roof, and might not ever, given the system that I have installed. I also plan to install CCF and MLV at a later date.

I will also be stuffing the hatch with denim insulation. If you really want to kill the hatch panel rattles, you should replace the factory cover with a bolted piece of 1/4" MDF.











Also, owning two first gen xBs is nice, because I can do A/B comparisons pretty easily. ;) Below is a quick video I shot demonstrating the before and after difference with a simple knock test.

 

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First, I absolutely LOVE the thieves sign! LOL
I do agree that 100% coverage is not absolutely a must. The intent of mat is to change the resonant frequency of the metal. Almost every display for products like Dynamat that I have seen over the years has consisted of two identical bells, side by side. One naked, the other with a strip or two of the deadening material in question adhered to the sides of the bell. The intent is for the customer to knock on each bell, hearing the difference made by the deadening. Usually, the bell is not entirely covered with deadening, only a strip or two is attached. The naked bell rings out, the deadened bell just makes a quick "thud."
Even at 150+ sq. ft., I do not have every surface covered. I doubled up in key spots, like behind the mids in the doors and focused on areas where I felt the material would be most effective. For instance, I have a significant amount of material in the front doors, but not quite as much in the rears. The reason is that my rear doors do not contain a mid driver and therefore will not be subject to the same sets of frequencies as the front doors.
My floor has a criss-cross pattern, with a bit more concentration in the rear spare tire area. This area is very hollow and has a tendency to echo more than other parts of the cab, especially with the spare tire and paneling gone. I believe the roof is a must, almost more so than the floor. This material is quite thin, very large, and is very willing to resonate at normal frequencies. The next time you have your headliner out, drive around with your hand on the roof. You can easily feel the panel resonating. A criss-cross pattern will definitely make a difference.
 

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I had actually intended to deaden my floor with CLD. However, after doing some more research, I decided to skip it entirely. There really isn't any need at all to add CLD to the floor. You'd be much better served to add MLV and possibly some CLD to the floors.

The roof, I can agree with. I haven't done mine yet, and probably won't unless resonance really becomes an issue there. (I've got more hatch and door lock gremlins to address first). But I am not an SPL guy. and only have about 800w going to my Arc Black 12. So far, roof resonance hasn't been a big issue.

---------- Post added 03-19-2014 at 03:30 PM ----------

Oh, and I've got the .44 Magnum in the house to match the sign. ;)
 

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The Asian Pursuasion
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Discussion Starter #11
Oh believe me I have researched this as much as possible. Since I'm mobile right now, can't really support reading your article the way I want so it'll have to wait. Although I would really like to read your findings.
 

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First, I absolutely LOVE the thieves sign! LOL
I do agree that 100% coverage is not absolutely a must. The intent of mat is to change the resonant frequency of the metal. Almost every display for products like Dynamat that I have seen over the years has consisted of two identical bells, side by side. One naked, the other with a strip or two of the deadening material in question adhered to the sides of the bell. The intent is for the customer to knock on each bell, hearing the difference made by the deadening. Usually, the bell is not entirely covered with deadening, only a strip or two is attached. The naked bell rings out, the deadened bell just makes a quick "thud."
Even at 150+ sq. ft., I do not have every surface covered. I doubled up in key spots, like behind the mids in the doors and focused on areas where I felt the material would be most effective. For instance, I have a significant amount of material in the front doors, but not quite as much in the rears. The reason is that my rear doors do not contain a mid driver and therefore will not be subject to the same sets of frequencies as the front doors.
My floor has a criss-cross pattern, with a bit more concentration in the rear spare tire area. This area is very hollow and has a tendency to echo more than other parts of the cab, especially with the spare tire and paneling gone. I believe the roof is a must, almost more so than the floor. This material is quite thin, very large, and is very willing to resonate at normal frequencies. The next time you have your headliner out, drive around with your hand on the roof. You can easily feel the panel resonating. A criss-cross pattern will definitely make a difference.
Awesome stuff. And yea in the past I've seen plenty of people Dynamat every inch of their rides and it definitely seemed like overkill.
 
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