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2012 Scion xB
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Hello All,

I am researching the feasibility of mounting a rooftop tent on my 2nd Generation xB. My vehicles GVWR = 4,097 lbs. I had my car weighed on certified CAT scale and it weighed 3,500 lbs. If I add in the weight of the not yet installed tent, mounting bracket, roof rails, passenger, camping stuff, I will be close to if not over the GVWR. I am concerned about safety (handling, braking, top-heavy) as the tent will be on the roof 24/7 and the effect on MPG (I'm averaging 24 mix of city / highway).

What make & model tent do you have?

What does all your stuff weigh including humans and creatures when going traveling with it?

Thanks!

Patrick
 

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I do a lot of camping/traveling with my first gen. One thing I noticed is that 80mph with the rooftop tent is pretty much the fastest the box can go without the (automatic) transmission downshifting into 3rd gear to maintain this speed due to increased wind resistance. Though this may not be a problem on the 2nd gens with their bigger engines.

My first gen weighs 2,500 and it's GVW rating is 4,100 in it's original configuration which means I can (supposedly) safely pile as much as 1,600 pounds of extra stuff on it........don't believe the manufacturers GVWR.

With approximately 500 pounds of added weight in the rear of the car, the car sagged so much that the back end was hitting the bump-stops during full suspension compression. I eliminated this condition by installing stiffer progressive weight coil springs and softer shock absorbers.

Stopping the vehicle with the extra 500 pounds took a noticeably longer distance.

Next up was to deal with the brake system......totally inadequate when driving down twisty mountain roads with extra weight. I improved the brake system simply by installing drilled/slotter front brake rotors and installing pads/shoes with better braking materials. The drilled/slotted brake rotors improved braking ability, but I feel the better brake pad/shoe material was a bigger benefit than the rotors alone.

With water, food, fur babies and many camping supplies (including pulling a 700 pound loaded trailer) my first gen exceeds the GVWR by 900 pounds for a total GVW of 5,400 pounds. It drives safely. It stops reliably. This would not be possible to do in it's original configuration.

I don't have an exact answer for you, but I can say this: Load your box up. Make mental notes of how differently it handles with the extra weight and make improvements to whatever needs to be improved upon.

The GVWR is just the safety rating for the vehicle as it left the factory. You can improve upon that rating to increase capacity with aftermarket parts.
 
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