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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Put the Box on my lift today to reattach the rear bumper lower moulding.........backed into a parking stall and the curb almost ripped it off. Got it back on and looks ok.
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For y'all living in the Rust Belt.......heres a pic of what the bottom of a California car looks like after 18 years of daily use........zero rust!
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I lift my car higher and walk around underneath it to check things out. No leaks, no broken axle boots, no worn out ball joints. Everything looks great for 236,xxx miles. Only thing I see are a couple of cracked rear beam axle bushings. I HATE dealing with these particular bushings at work........
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Toyota requires me to remove the entire axle beam to replace these bushings. Howeverrrr......at my home shop (where corners can be cut) 馃榿. If anybody's wondering, the easy way to replace these bushings........here's how I do it at my shop after placing the new bushings in a freezer:

1) Lift the car off the ground.

2) Place a jack stand under each of the bushing locations.......me having a hydraulic lift, I use tall jack stands much like the ones you see at a muffler shop which hold up exhaust pipe.

3) Lower the car so the jack stands receive some weight on them.

4) Remove both of the bushing bolts.

5) Lift the car so that it raises up, away from the bushings and you have enough room to work around.

6) Drill out the rubber section of the bushings.

7) With the center of the bushing gone, use a cutting tool to cut across the width of the remaining bushing ring and push the ring out of the axle beam.

8) Heat up the axle beam area where the new bushings will be inserted into it's housing.

9) Grab a new bushings from the freezer and blast it for 20 or 30 seconds with nitrous oxide to make it super cold (shrinks).

10) Place the frozen bushing into its location on the beam.

When the beam and the bushings get to normal temperatures, they become secured to each other, lower the car to install the bushing bolts finger tight.......lower the car onto the ground and finally tighten up the bushing bolts to spec.

Changing these bushings my way at my shop takes less than 30 minutes........changing these bushings Toyota's way at the stealership takes me 2 hours because of the required BS, unnecessary procedure.
 

Lots o leather and copper
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Nice trick using the heat differences. Me, not having a lift, take my 2nd gen to my mechanic and lets him deal with pressing new poly bushings in on the press. Would be nice to have a lift but can't fit it with all my wood working equipment.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Looking at the pic of your mechanics tools......I want them. I want ALL of them! Lol. I already have all, but I just want more. It's a hoarders disease I have. 馃し

That hydraulic press......here's how I have mine set up: I have eliminated the hand pump mechanism and rigged up a small electric motor to pump the fluid. I also installed foot switches so I can pump fluid or release fluid with my foot. This comes in great when needing both my hands to manipulate whatever parts I'm working with on the press. Also, I have a little trolly rail mounted above the press. Mounted on this trolly rail is a cheap Harbor Freight wench designed for use on ATV's. I use this wench to lift/hold heavy parts suspended in the air while I position the heavy parts on the hydraulic press.

Like.....I see how your mechanic has the rear axle beam positioned on his press. He has to use two hands to position the axle beam on the lower press plates. He has to use a third hand to position the bushing on the axle beam. He has to use a fourth hand to pump the press. That's a lot of hands.

The way I got my hydraulic press and trolly rail set up is similar to what Toyota has in our service bays.......only difference is Toyota spent $125,000 for each of their set ups and I spent less than $1,000on mine.
 

Lots o leather and copper
Joined
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Yeah, he keeps wanting to the conversion to motorize the press. Then he gets busy and forgets about it. He did mention that balancing the beam on the press was not fun but once positioned it was remarkably stable. He use to be a Toyota tech years ago but has been independent for going on 20 years now. Always been our go to guy for Scion work due to that and being the president of the car club.
 
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