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im new here and i did some reading about wheels and spacers but still dont understand why you need them. also what spacers do you need to mount 17s or 18s?? any help would be great. im looking to pick some up with in the next couple of weeks. if you need specifics on sizes il post them back on here.
 

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i think if you want to go with a wider tire then you use a spacer so it wont rub......the local tire plance will be able to tell you what will work on your car
 

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TheOtherGuys
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How wide and what off-set will you be using. I have 18x7.5 w/ 40 off-set and I am running a 25mm spacer in the rear with minor to almost no issues. I just dropped it another half inch thursday and haven't rubbed. 42-45 off-set w/ a 25mm spacer and shouldn't rub at all, And your wheels would be set out pretty flush.
 

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There are two semi-independent reasons people use spacers between wheels and mounting surfaces... (1) to prevent oversized (or wrong offset) wheel/tire sets from rubbing on the wheelwells or suspension parts and (2) to make the rear track as wide as the front.

The rear track is 1 inch narrower than the front track, which means the rear wheels are 1/2 inch farther inside the body than the front wheels. Some people don't like that, and use 10-15mm spacers to move the rear wheels out farther. (Rear track narrower than front track is extremely common in modern chassis design.)

In the case of interference with the suspension or wheelwell, folks use whatever thickness of spacer is needed to make it work with their desired wheels and tires.

One thing to remember is that spacers can actually reduce the strength of the rear suspension.

First and most obvious, is the studs sticking out of the brake drums are only so long. Placing a spacer between the drum and wheel not only greatly reduces the amount of stud the lug nut can hang on to, it puts the wheel, and therefore the weight of the vehicle, out at the end of the stud, instead of up against the drum. This greatly increases the load on the wheel bearings, studs, and other suspension parts.

Longer studs are available to replace the OEM studs so that there is adequate load-bearing thread for the lug nuts to hold on to, and with the thicker spacers are absolutely necessary.

There is no 'fix' for the additional torsion load on the suspension, so one just needs to drive in a manner that does bend or break parts, and pay attention to alignment so that one knows if something gets bent. Attention to wheel bearings is a good idea, too, since they can wear faster with the change in load position.

Everything's a trade-off, eh? :)

Tomas
 

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Tomas said:
There are two semi-independent reasons people use spacers between wheels and mounting surfaces... (1) to prevent oversized (or wrong offset) wheel/tire sets from rubbing on the wheelwells or suspension parts and (2) to make the rear track as wide as the front.

The rear track is 1 inch narrower than the front track, which means the rear wheels are 1/2 inch farther inside the body than the front wheels. Some people don't like that, and use 10-15mm spacers to move the rear wheels out farther. (Rear track narrower than front track is extremely common in modern chassis design.)

In the case of interference with the suspension or wheelwell, folks use whatever thickness of spacer is needed to make it work with their desired wheels and tires.

One thing to remember is that spacers can actually reduce the strength of the rear suspension.

First and most obvious, is the studs sticking out of the brake drums are only so long. Placing a spacer between the drum and wheel not only greatly reduces the amount of stud the lug nut can hang on to, it puts the wheel, and therefore the weight of the vehicle, out at the end of the stud, instead of up against the drum. This greatly increases the load on the wheel bearings, studs, and other suspension parts.

Longer studs are available to replace the OEM studs so that there is adequate load-bearing thread for the lug nuts to hold on to, and with the thicker spacers are absolutely necessary.

There is no 'fix' for the additional torsion load on the suspension, so one just needs to drive in a manner that does bend or break parts, and pay attention to alignment so that one knows if something gets bent. Attention to wheel bearings is a good idea, too, since they can wear faster with the change in load position.

Everything's a trade-off, eh? :)

Tomas
damn, thats some of the realest shittt ive heard
 
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