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Farewell. I have officially sold my beloved Toaster when I bought a newer car. I saw that I joined this in 2011 when I returned from working overseas. I put 110k miles on it and it ran like a top! The clearcoat was failing and exterior and interior bits were coming off. While I enjoy my new hybrid (seriously, the way to go!) I do miss the versatility and hauling capacity! Hopefully it's new owner will enjoy it as much as I did!
AND, this is a great sharing and supportive community! I would hope that this attitude is pervasive throughout each aspect of your lives! Peace!
 

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Farewell. I have officially sold my beloved Toaster when I bought a newer car. I saw that I joined this in 2011 when I returned from working overseas. I put 110k miles on it and it ran like a top! The clearcoat was failing and exterior and interior bits were coming off. While I enjoy my new hybrid (seriously, the way to go!) I do miss the versatility and hauling capacity! Hopefully it's new owner will enjoy it as much as I did!
AND, this is a great sharing and supportive community! I would hope that this attitude is pervasive throughout each aspect of your lives! Peace!
Alas our Bryla we knew Bryla well. ( That's Shakespeare) enjoy your hybrid. Know that the xB community will be here for you. Merry Christmas and have a blessed life...
 

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Congrats on getting a hybrid vehicle. Me and my wife were buying a Toyota EV. We traded it in and are now buying a Toyota HV. The HV is a 2021 RAV4 Prime which has the ability to be 100% electric or 100% gas or a combination of both.

Some information I've learned since owning this Rav4 Prime:

EV is an electric powered vehicle.
HV is electric & gas powered vehicle.

It's common courtesy to let EV powered vehicles charge before an HV powered vehicle because the EV needs electricity to drive, where as the HV has the option to drive with gasoline....and gasoline is easier to obtain relative quickly.

Level 2 Stations don't cost any money to use.......When charging at a Level 2 station, I don't lock my charge port and I put a note on the handle stating: "Take the plug if you need power". Lots of HV owners do this for the benefit of the EV owners.

You can buy charger adapters for use at Tesla charge stations.

"Filling up" at a Tesla "Super Charger" station is not always cheaper than filling a tank full of gas.

"Destination Chargers" belong to property owners on which the chargers are installed and the amount of $$$ it cost to use them is set by the individual property owner......... Much like the cost to use a privately owned ATM. The prices are not regulated.

However......if you see 6 (six) Tesla chargers next to privately owned Destination Chargers, the Destination Chargers prices will infact be regulated to the standards in which the Tesla chargers are regulated.........I don't know why this is, but it is.


These Destination Chargers (without Tesla chargers present) are a rip off. The battery range increases approximately half the rate of the minutes the charger is connected. By this I mean, (example) if you charge for 60 minutes, your vehicle range increases 30 miles, and it costs $7..... When you could have simply pulled into a gas station pumped $5 worth of gas and been back on the road in 5 minutes & drive 30 miles.

Get a 220v home charger kit installed ASAP.

The 110v home chargers are too slow (12 hours)........you'll find that you'll be charging (often) during peak $$$ electricity prices.

The 220v home chargers can reach full charge in 3 hours from zero range.

220v power cost more per hour than 120v power, but 3 hours of 220v cost way less than 12 hours of 120v.....if that makes sense.

If you do get a home charger, buy an ON/OFF timer and schedule it to charge between the hours of 10pm-1am.

Depending on your hybrid, if it's capable of running completely on battery power and you use it strictly as an electrical vehicle, start the gasoline engine atleast once every couple weeks. Helps keep oil from draining out of engine parts which you don't want it draining from.

Here's a biggie, but if you own your house, to maximize the financial benefit of owning a hybrid vehicle, convert your house to solar, install an inverter system which sends excess electricity back into your city infrastructure power grid. This is how I have power set up in my home. None of my electricity bills this year have been over $30. I now only charge the Rav4 hybrid at home. So basically it's costs next to nothing to drive.
 

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Congrats on getting a hybrid vehicle. Me and my wife were buying a Toyota EV. We traded it in and are now buying a Toyota HV. The HV is a 2021 RAV4 Prime which has the ability to be 100% electric or 100% gas or a combination of both.

Some information I've learned since owning this Rav4 Prime:

EV is an electric powered vehicle.
HV is electric & gas powered vehicle.

It's common courtesy to let EV powered vehicles charge before an HV powered vehicle because the EV needs electricity to drive, where as the HV has the option to drive with gasoline....and gasoline is easier to obtain relative quickly.

Level 2 Stations don't cost any money to use.......When charging at a Level 2 station, I don't lock my charge port and I put a note on the handle stating: "Take the plug if you need power". Lots of HV owners do this for the benefit of the EV owners.

You can buy charger adapters for use at Tesla charge stations.

"Filling up" at a Tesla "Super Charger" station is not always cheaper than filling a tank full of gas.

"Destination Chargers" belong to property owners on which the chargers are installed and the amount of $$$ it cost to use them is set by the individual property owner......... Much like the cost to use a privately owned ATM. The prices are not regulated.

However......if you see 6 (six) Tesla chargers next to privately owned Destination Chargers, the Destination Chargers prices will infact be regulated to the standards in which the Tesla chargers are regulated.........I don't know why this is, but it is.


These Destination Chargers (without Tesla chargers present) are a rip off. The battery range increases approximately half the rate of the minutes the charger is connected. By this I mean, (example) if you charge for 60 minutes, your vehicle range increases 30 miles, and it costs $7..... When you could have simply pulled into a gas station pumped $5 worth of gas and been back on the road in 5 minutes & drive 30 miles.

Get a 220v home charger kit installed ASAP.

The 110v home chargers are too slow (12 hours)........you'll find that you'll be charging (often) during peak $$$ electricity prices.

The 220v home chargers can reach full charge in 3 hours from zero range.

220v power cost more per hour than 120v power, but 3 hours of 220v cost way less than 12 hours of 120v.....if that makes sense.

If you do get a home charger, buy an ON/OFF timer and schedule it to charge between the hours of 10pm-1am.

Depending on your hybrid, if it's capable of running completely on battery power and you use it strictly as an electrical vehicle, start the gasoline engine atleast once every couple weeks. Helps keep oil from draining out of engine parts which you don't want it draining from.

Here's a biggie, but if you own your house, to maximize the financial benefit of owning a hybrid vehicle, convert your house to solar, install an inverter system which sends excess electricity back into your city infrastructure power grid. This is how I have power set up in my home. None of my electricity bills this year have been over $30. I now only charge the Rav4 hybrid at home. So basically it's costs next to nothing to drive.
thanks for the great writeup. just curious, what steered you towards the HV vs a full EV? I know right now, Toyota only has one EV model but in a year or two will have more.
 

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The main reason for going with HV is because me andy family take long road trips.....500+ miles. The EV would deplete the range within 300 miles (or less). We'd be stuck charging for hours.....there's been times when we rented a motel room just to wait while while the EV charges up. Our new HV, we drive and deplete the power, we switch over to gas power and continue driving while the battery charges. We reach our destination and let it charge up
 

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ah got it. excellent thinking. I think the charging infrastructure is still a few years away, so yup PHEV is your best option and for anyone traveling long distances. my next car will either be full EV or at least some kind of hybrid option for sure. have fun w/ yours!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hey there. Sorry I wasn't checking these forums any more!

Did get a Honda Accord hybrid and currently enjoying 44mpg city driving! I went hybrid in lieu of the Kia EV6 which I really wanted but the $10k-15k dealer mark up cured that desire. I will wait for next gen battery technology which is a few years out. I also went this route bc my researched articles found better reliability than the plug in hybrids. Not knocking anything nor anyone just relaying what I research I found that lead to my decision. Hybrids are a great transition.

I also bought stock in ChargePoint and EVGo knowing they have the largest infrastructure contracts. Unfortunately, it has not panned out...yet!

And I am already in the solar club! Our 5.8kW system turned on in October and we get credit for our net export back to the grid. We had it sized for a future EV when that day comes. I designed my rebuild such that the roof is optimal for the array. Much like the gauges and display in the hybrid, I enjoy seeing my net power export on sunny days here in Florida! A ball of gas burning 93 million miles away powering our home and locking in our energy costs for the next 20-25 years is pretty cool!

I feel I must mention this, too: As a landscape architect, I removed all but one turf panel in my yard. The rest is planted with Florida native mix of shrubs and pollinators to create habitat, reduce/eliminate fertilizers, water requirements, and maintenance. I have no irrigation and water only upon establishment of new plants. Water is the new oil. I encourage you to remove your lawns that you have no need for and replace with area specific natives that grow on rainfall only (or install a drip system). Habitat is huge and native bees are the canaries in the coalmine. Additionally, you have a living breathing (creating oxygen) environment vs a chemically induced sterile surface that you likely never use.

All the best!
 
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