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Well, better late than never on this one. I'd love to push the rear wheels out a bit on my 2004 xB. I'll likely take any size, but would prefer 1/2" to 3/4" rear hub spacers - not the common wheel spacers. Pic attached, to avoid confusion. Please send back details (size, with/without bolts) and a price shipped to Maryland (20814). Thank you!
 

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Still looking...
As are a whole lot of us.

I wonder if it would make sense to create a wanna buy hub spacers thread just so enough demand is presented to get former providers to break out their templates.

Just in time for Christmas. :)
 

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I dont think it would be safe. Wheel bearing assembly slides into the rear axle beam and is kinda like hub centric wheels. The bolts just hold them in place. Now by using a spacer you are using longer bolts which means more stress(leverage) on the bolts add to the fact that the hub is no longer holding up the weight, doesnt sound good to me.
 

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Those look hub centric to me. I have extended bolts but no longer use my spacer, for now at least because I have 17x8.25 XXR and scrape the back fender well with ppl in the back seat, and its no big deal. Those look pretty solid.

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Those look hub centric to me. I have extended bolts but no longer use my spacer, for now at least because I have 17x8.25 XXR and scrape the back fender well with ppl in the back seat, and its no big deal. Those look pretty solid.

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well I guess it would have to be thin enough yes I said thin enough for the wheel bearing hub assembly to slide thorough the spacer and reach the axle beam slot. Even if that was the case you are severely reducing the surface area where the bearing assembly rests on the actual axle beam.

edit with higher grade bolts this might not be a problem for normal city driving. However, I have extreme summer tires and drive my car really hard, sometimes I drive up in the canyons (I wish I had a second car do so but all I got is the xb) I just wanted to say IMO I personally wouldn't do it and look for other spacing methods.
 

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I dont think it would be safe. Wheel bearing assembly slides into the rear axle beam and is kinda like hub centric wheels. The bolts just hold them in place. Now by using a spacer you are using longer bolts which means more stress(leverage) on the bolts add to the fact that the hub is no longer holding up the weight, doesnt sound good to me.
In my case I'm only talking about 10 - 20 MM spacing. I'm pretty sure stress tolerance remains WELL within original engineering specs.

Ser-dad, you're talking about an entirely different type of spacer. The kind that mounts between the wheel and the hub. Not a fan of those as they move the center of the wheel out of alignment with the wheel bearing. I wouldn't go more than 10MM on those for that reason.
 

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In my case I'm only talking about 10 - 20 MM spacing. I'm pretty sure stress tolerance remains WELL within original engineering specs.

Ser-dad, you're talking about an entirely different type of spacer. The kind that mounts between the wheel and the hub. Not a fan of those as they move the center of the wheel out of alignment with the wheel bearing. I wouldn't go more than 10MM on those for that reason.
I don't know off the top of my head how thick the part of the hub that slots into the axle beam is. However, if the spacer pushes it out enough that it no longer sits in the axle beam, it can be a problem. the bolts that bolt down the hub is significantly weaker than the wheel studs(not that this matters for concerns of breaking wheel studs because the wheels themselves are hub centric, but this is a comparison to show that those 4 bolts were not designed to be the stress point or they wouldve been made stronger from the factory. It may be hard to understand without taking the bearing off and seeing for yourself.
 
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