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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I got my Project Mu brake pads in today, thx to bBist.com

I'll be putting them in on the weekend, I just need to know what's the best way to break them in?

I've heard taking it easy for the first 400-500 miles is a good thing to do.... anything else?
 

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I didn't know you were supposed to break in brake pads...
 

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That break in doesn't apply to pads. Have at it.

Let us know how they work out.
 

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Yes, there is a "break in" for new brake pads, drums, or rotors. It is actually "seating" the pads so that their entire surface touches the surface of the rotor or drum. If the entire pad (or shoe) doesn't touch evenly, those much smaller patches that DO touch can severely overheat in hard braking and damage the pads, shoes, rotors, or drums.

Even your Owners Manual gives specific instruction/warning on breaking in new brakes...

• Try to avoid hard stops during the first 300 km (200 miles).
Again, it is a bunch of easy, gentle stops for the first 200 miles, THEN you can stomp 'em and get 'em glowing red as you charge into corners. :D

Tomas
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Tomas, that's just what I was looking for. I can always count on you to come up with the right answers.

I checked out TireRack's directions on seating pads correctly, and they say to take it easy for the first 4-500 miles, but they also said to check the manufactures directions. Unfortunately, Project Mu's english section is severely lacking, so there's no info on seating them.
 

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Don't break in brake pads. Install them then go out onto your street and do two or three good hard stops and you are set.
 

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Other than the break-in period, you have to bed the pads to the rotors, especially if you are installing new pads on old rotors. Bedding the pads matches the two surfaces better and coats the rotor with a slight film of material. It reduces vibrations and noise in the long run, and you really aren't braking to the full potential without doing it.

There are many write-ups on proper bedding procedure, and each one is slightly different. This is the method I use to bed in every set of brakes I have installed over the past 15 years, which probably averages out to at least 6-7 per month (I haven't done that many in the past few years or the average would be much more):

Step 1:
Decelerate from 35mph to 5mph - using moderate brake presure (50-60%)
Do not come to a complete stop and do not drag the brakes after reaching 5mph. Gently re-accelerate to 35mph.
Repeat this process 4 times.

Step 2:
Decelerate from 45mph to 0mph - using more brake pressure (80%)
Do not lock the brakes. Do not STAY stopped with your foot on the brake pedal - allow the car to roll slightly. Gently re-accelerate to 45mph.
Repeat this process 3 times.

Step 3:
Drive a short distance - allowing the brakes to cool.
Park the vehicle, and allow the brake system to fully cool to ambient (outside) temperatures (15-30 minutes). While stopped, do not apply the parking brake or keep your foot on the brake pedal for extended periods of time.

This procedure is very mild compared to what I use for race pads, where I drag the brakes for about 1/2 mile to create high temps.
 

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Ah! Thank you, Black Cube!

I'm not a brake person, so I was unsure if that sort of routine was still done (which is why I didn't say anything - if I don't know, I don't say).

What you recommend is very like what I have heard suggested before and done myself, the idea being to gently wear the pads/rotors into better contact while NOT allowing random hot-spots to cause damage by breaking hard or concentrating the heat by holding the brakes on when stopped - keep 'em moving.

Hopefully this will help some folks. :)

Tomas
 

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good lord people, the easiest way to breakin pads. Follow the rules of the DMV book for a week and your brakes will break in properly. When i say follow the rules, I mean to the last period. The speed limit on the on ramp says 35, when you know that you took it at 50. Thats what I mean by follow the rules of the DMV handbook. Your brakes will break in properly with the resurfaced rotors.
 

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black_cube said:
Other than the break-in period, you have to bed the pads to the rotors, especially if you are installing new pads on old rotors. Bedding the pads matches the two surfaces better and coats the rotor with a slight film of material. It reduces vibrations and noise in the long run, and you really aren't braking to the full potential without doing it.

There are many write-ups on proper bedding procedure, and each one is slightly different. This is the method I use to bed in every set of brakes I have installed over the past 15 years, which probably averages out to at least 6-7 per month (I haven't done that many in the past few years or the average would be much more):

Step 1:
Decelerate from 35mph to 5mph - using moderate brake presure (50-60%)
Do not come to a complete stop and do not drag the brakes after reaching 5mph. Gently re-accelerate to 35mph.
Repeat this process 4 times.

Step 2:
Decelerate from 45mph to 0mph - using more brake pressure (80%)
Do not lock the brakes. Do not STAY stopped with your foot on the brake pedal - allow the car to roll slightly. Gently re-accelerate to 45mph.
Repeat this process 3 times.

Step 3:
Drive a short distance - allowing the brakes to cool.
Park the vehicle, and allow the brake system to fully cool to ambient (outside) temperatures (15-30 minutes). While stopped, do not apply the parking brake or keep your foot on the brake pedal for extended periods of time.

This procedure is very mild compared to what I use for race pads, where I drag the brakes for about 1/2 mile to create high temps.
I've used a very similar technique myself since 1982. I've used it for just preformance brake pads, and also for the rotor/pad swap.
 
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