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I sent some parts off to Florida to have white carbon fiber material applied to them. I got some bad news today, the painter says it looks like checkerboard rather than white C/F.

Does anyone know of a company in the So Cal area that does this kind of work? I've Googled Water Transfer Printing but all I seem to come up with is places to buy the equipment to do it. I'm hoping to find someone that can do the white C/F with better results. I'm bummed since I thought it was going to work. :( If I can't find someone who can do it well I'll have to go back to plan A, just paint the parts white.
 

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Looks like you just spoiled the surprise of the Blue Tape Dash.............Wish I could help you out...............That would have been HOT!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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There is an old trick for painting RC car bodies, that I know will work here, and will likely look better than the water transfer anyway.

1. There is some kind of cloth (cheese cloth is what I think it is called) that looks like a mesh, and is kinda sticky. You put it on the part and wrap it around the edges keeping it as straight as possible, and it will lightly stick to the surface.

2. *Lightly* spray the 2nd color of your choice over the part, then remove the cheese cloth and thats it. I would spray a clear over it to make it real shiny, but it's that easy.

I will look into it and find out the exact name of the cloth tonight.

This may sound crazy, but it really does work!
 

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xjeepguy said:
There is an old trick for painting RC car bodies, that I know will work here, and will likely look better than the water transfer anyway.

1. There is some kind of cloth (cheese cloth is what I think it is called) that looks like a mesh, and is kinda sticky. You put it on the part and wrap it around the edges keeping it as straight as possible, and it will lightly stick to the surface.

2. *Lightly* spray the 2nd color of your choice over the part, then remove the cheese cloth and thats it. I would spray a clear over it to make it real shiny, but it's that easy.

I will look into it and find out the exact name of the cloth tonight.

This may sound crazy, but it really does work!
Thanks for the suggestion. I think this is going to be a PITA. The water transfer printing works great, it's what the car manufacturers use to do the wood grain on the plastic parts. Since it's submerged in the water/ink mixture it covers the item no matter what the shape is. I'll look forward to your information, thanks again.
 

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Here is an article I found on how to do it. Now keep in mind that this is for painting on the inside of a clear rc car body, so you will have to paint your main color first, then paint the lighter color on then a clear finish to make it shinier.

The bodies I have seen painted with this method really do look like CF.


Everybody loves the look of carbon fiber, after all, carbon fiber says "custom" and "racing!" Achieving the carbon fiber look on your cars is not difficult at all to paint, but it does require planning and preparation. To achieve this affect, you will need to pick up a rubber woven kitchen drawer liner. These are available in a number of patterns, so make sure you pick out the one with the smallest, tightest pattern. Usually, you can buy the liner in rolls so you will have plenty to do multiple bodies. While you can paint the carbon fiber affect in just about any color, the combination of Parma Faspearl Black and Faspearl Charcoal work very well together and provide the translucent depth that real carbon fiber has.

Since it is very difficult to get the liner to form to complex curves, it is best to do this technique on relatively flat areas of the body. If you do need it to stick around gentle curves, you can use masking tape to hold the corners in place or you can spray the liner with artist tack adhesive. Once you pull the liner up, you wont notice the adhesive.

Cut out the size of liner that you need, which excess of about ½ inch bigger on each side.
Lay the liner in the body where you want the carbon fiber effect. Tape it in place if necessary being careful to place the tape on gently.
Fill your paint cup with Faspearl Charcoal and spray an even coat across the mask while turning the body gently so as not to disturb the mask.
Set the body to the side and let that coat dry for 30 to 60 minutes.
Don't attempt a second coat since it isn't necessary and you will usually disturb the mask, ruining the pattern.
Lift the mask off the body and you will see a checkerboard pattern.
Fill your paint cup with the Faspearl Black and spray a top coat.
Use your hairdryer to speed up the drying.
Apply two more even coats with the Faspearl Black and consider it done!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
xjeepguy said:
Here is an article I found on how to do it. Now keep in mind that this is for painting on the inside of a clear rc car body, so you will have to paint your main color first, then paint the lighter color on then a clear finish to make it shinier.

The bodies I have seen painted with this method really do look like CF.


Everybody loves the look of carbon fiber, after all, carbon fiber says "custom" and "racing!" Achieving the carbon fiber look on your cars is not difficult at all to paint, but it does require planning and preparation. To achieve this affect, you will need to pick up a rubber woven kitchen drawer liner. These are available in a number of patterns, so make sure you pick out the one with the smallest, tightest pattern. Usually, you can buy the liner in rolls so you will have plenty to do multiple bodies. While you can paint the carbon fiber affect in just about any color, the combination of Parma Faspearl Black and Faspearl Charcoal work very well together and provide the translucent depth that real carbon fiber has.

Since it is very difficult to get the liner to form to complex curves, it is best to do this technique on relatively flat areas of the body. If you do need it to stick around gentle curves, you can use masking tape to hold the corners in place or you can spray the liner with artist tack adhesive. Once you pull the liner up, you wont notice the adhesive.

Cut out the size of liner that you need, which excess of about ½ inch bigger on each side.
Lay the liner in the body where you want the carbon fiber effect. Tape it in place if necessary being careful to place the tape on gently.
Fill your paint cup with Faspearl Charcoal and spray an even coat across the mask while turning the body gently so as not to disturb the mask.
Set the body to the side and let that coat dry for 30 to 60 minutes.
Don't attempt a second coat since it isn't necessary and you will usually disturb the mask, ruining the pattern.
Lift the mask off the body and you will see a checkerboard pattern.
Fill your paint cup with the Faspearl Black and spray a top coat.
Use your hairdryer to speed up the drying.
Apply two more even coats with the Faspearl Black and consider it done!
Thanks! Sounds like a cool idea but since I'm painting the center dash piece and the gauge housing it may be too many curves.
 
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